Views of the 20th century: Duby-Ariès // Lecturas del s.XX: Duby-Ariès

For a better understanding and to complete all those elements linked to the brand experience that influence the buying process, we will count with the collaboration of experts that will introduce concepts that will improve our business development, from different disciplines and points of view. Today we are pleased to introduce a new text of Insik W. Yoon, sociologist.

Internet, social media, privacy are hot topics in business today. Every enterprise tends to the Net and it seems inevitable that we will living in an “entangled” society. With IT and mobile connectivity to transform any place in a workplace, and the problem of privacy in social networks, it is obvious to consider where it begins and ends the private sphere. In an interview in a Spanish newspaper at Polo brothers, creators of Territorio Creativo and authors of #Socialholic (Gestión 2000), Fernando Polo made this reflection: “the line between the private and the personal will be diluted in the coming years.” Do not quite understand the difference between private and personal, but the comment reminded me of a monumental work by historians led by Georges Duby and Philippe Ariès, the fifth volume of the History of Private Life: Riddles of Identity in Modern Times .

Duby explains that the dissociation between business and family was not a strictly a urban phenomenon. In the peasantry, this movement of separation among the farm and home starts during the nineteenth century when raising a wall between the common room and the barn. This is not to preserve family privacy, but to dissociate clearly the work and private life; both become autonomous. Thereafter, one is structured in opposition to the other. In the early twentieth century that border was still confused; before, the company or the family farm gathered in one place two sets of different activities.

The history of the twentieth century, in part, is the history of this dissociation, which also implies a distinction between time and space. The organization of the workplace specializes with the diffusion of Taylorism, which implies a strict order and assigns each worker a place, reinforcing the control over the domain of time and space. The use of time is structured following the differentiation of space. But as sensed Fernando Polo, “we are workers of the information society and the opposite is happening to us.” Work starts in the same place where you live, you start to “live” where you work (anywhere) which will lead to a cultural change in the way of thinking about “life and work” beyond the conventional schemes of “balancing family and work.” The spaces are becoming multifunctional and fickle. Control over the time and space domain is diluted, and the individual gains in power of choice.

The History of Private Life reviews the history of the last two thousand years from the perspective of this double conflict, showing how we have engaged in constant battles between the private and public, separated by a “wall” that moves back and forth, marking the end and beginning of new eras. The private power resists outwards from the assaults of public power, but inside, it also contains individual aspirations to independence.

I.W.Y.
Ego Consumans

—-

Para completar y entender mejor todos los elementos vinculados a la experiencia de marca que inciden en el proceso de compra, contaremos con la colaboración de expertos que nos irán introduciendo, desde distintas disciplinas y visiones, conceptos que nos ayudarán a construir mejor nuestro negocio. Hoy estamos encantados de presentaros un nuevo texto de Insik W. Yoon, sociólogo.

Internet, redes sociales, privacidad son temas candentes de la actualidad empresarial. Todo negocio tiende a la Red y parece irremediable que viviremos en una sociedad “enredada”. Con las TI y la conectividad móvil que transforman cualquier lugar en un lugar de trabajo, y el problema de la privacidad en las redes sociales, es obvio plantearse dónde empieza y dónde acaba la esfera de lo privado. En una entrevista a los hermanos Polo, creadores de Territorio Creativo y autores de #Socialholic (Gestión 2000), Fernando Polo hacía esta reflexión: “la barrera entre lo privado y lo personal se diluirá en los próximos años”. No entiendo muy bien la diferencia entre lo privado y lo personal, pero el comentario me recordó una obra monumental dirigida por los historiadores Georges Duby y Philipe Ariès, el quinto volumen de la Historia de la vida privada: de la Primera Guerra Mundial hasta nuestros días.

Duby explica que la disociación entre la empresa y la familia no fue un fenómeno estrictamente urbano. En el campesinado, este movimiento de separación entre la explotación y el domicilio se inicia durante el s.XIX cuando se eleva un muro entre la habitación común y el establo. No se trata de preservar la intimidad familiar, sino de disociar claramente el trabajo y la vida privada; ambas se hacen autónomas. A partir de entonces, ésta se estructura por oposición a aquélla. A comienzos del s.XX esa frontera todavía se confundía; antes, la empresa o la explotación familiar reunía en un único y mismo lugar dos series de actividades diferentes.

La historia del s.XX es, en parte, la historia de esta disociación, que implica además una diferenciación de tiempo y espacio. La organización del lugar de trabajo se especializa con la difusión del taylorismo, que implica un orden estricto y asigna a cada obrero un lugar; se refuerza el control sobre el dominio del tiempo y el espacio. La utilización del tiempo se estructura siguiendo la diferenciación del espacio. Pero como intuía Fernando Polo, “a nosotros, que somos trabajadores de la sociedad de la información, nos está pasando lo contrario”. Se empieza a trabajar en el mismo sitio donde se vive, se empieza a “vivir” en donde se trabaja (en cualquier lugar): lo que llevará a un cambio cultural en la forma de concebir “vida y trabajo” más allá de las formas convencionales de la “conciliación familiar y del trabajo”. Los espacios empiezan a ser multifuncionales y volubles. El control sobre el dominio del tiempo y el espacio se diluye, y el individuo gana en poder de elección.

La Historia de la vida privada repasa la historia de los últimos dos mil años desde la perspectiva de este doble conflicto, mostrando cómo se han entablado combates constantes entre lo privado y lo público, separados por un “muro” que avanza y retrocede, marcando el fin y el comienzo de nuevas épocas. El poder privado resiste, hacia fuera, los asaltos del poder público; pero, hacia dentro, también contiene las aspiraciones individuales a la independencia.

I.W.Y.
Ego Consumans

Anuncios

Work sweet home // Trabajo dulce hogar

Workstyle at Unilever via contemporist.com

Workstyle at Facebook via chilloutpoint.com

Workstyle at Lego via fastcodesign.com

Google, Facebook, Twitter, Lego, …are listed as the best brands to work for. Every day they receive lots of requests to work for them. Their headquarters are admired worldwide for the facilities and possibilities that give to the workers, creating spaces where leisure is the melody and self-discipline and productivity mark the rhythm.

To create optimal working conditions, we must be able to design spaces that encourage internal communication in which they breathe the values and philosophy of the brand. Gone are the offices where hierarchies were identified in high skyscrapers vertically, the horizontal structures can manage better the talent and aspirations of employees, aligning both personally and professionally under a common project. The individual work spaces turn into shared work areas where workers can move and work together. Considering everything that can affect the productivity of the team  and its needs, adding services, spaces and activities such as kindergarden, dining rooms, areas of inspiration and to combat stress, etc.. All this combined with a high level of transparency will improve self-discipline and professional rigor, as was said in the latest collaboration of Insik W. Yoon.

A brand not only needs to transmit its brand experience to the user, employees must feel it is part of them. Taking into account that the brand experience of the worker starts when they’re leaving home to work and until they return, work-journeys should also be considered as we’ll know the state of mind of the employees when they arrive and leave their job.

The company workers are the major ambassadors of the brand and so is extremely important that they feel part of the common corporative project as well as of the ‘family’ that makes it possible. Environments in which to say: ‘Work Sweet Home’.

Brandcelona can advise you on the most important elements to design and manage work spaces. Do not hesitate to contact us at info@brandcelona.com so we can study your best alternatives and plan how to carry them out in your business plan.

—-

Google, Facebook, Twitter, Lego, …, constan como las mejores marcas en las que trabajar. Cada día reciben montones de solicitudes para poder trabajar para ellas. Sus sedes son admiradas en todo el mundo por las facilidades y posibilidades que dan al trabajador, creando espacios en los que el ocio es la melodía pero la autodisciplina y la productividad marcan el ritmo.

Para crear unas condiciones de trabajo óptimas, debemos ser capaces de diseñar espacios que favorezcan la comunicación interna de los empleados en los que se respiren los valores y la filosofía de la marca. Lejos quedan las sedes en las que las jerarquías se identificaban verticalmente en altos rascacielos, las estructuras horizontales pueden gestionar mejor el talento y las aspiraciones de los empleados, alineándolos personal y profesionalmente bajo un proyecto común. Los espacios de trabajo individuales se transforman en salas de trabajo compartido en los que los trabajadores pueden moverse y trabajar en equipo. Se tiene en cuenta todo aquello que puede afectar a la productividad del equipo y a sus necesidades, añadiendo servicios, espacios y actividades como guarderías, comedores, salas de inspiración y para combatir el estrés, etc. Todo ello combinado con un alto nivel de transparencia con la que, como comentaba Insik W. Yoon en su última colaboración, la autodisciplina y el rigor profesional propio aumentan considerablemente.

La marca ya no sólo necesita transmitir su experiencia al usuario sino que el trabajador también debe sentirla suya. Teniendo en cuenta pues, que la experiencia de marca del trabajador empezará desde que sale de casa a trabajar y hasta que vuelve; los trayectos también deberán tenerse en cuenta ya que nos indicarán en qué estado de ánimo llegan o se van los empleados.

Los trabajadores de una empresa son los principales embajadores de la marca y por ello es sumamente importante que se sientan parte del proyecto empresarial común así como de la ‘família’ que lo hace posible. Ambientes en los que poder decir: ‘Trabajo dulce hogar’.

Brandcelona te puede asesorar sobre cómo diseñar y gestionar eficazmente los espacios de trabajo de tu empresa. No dudes en contactarnos en info@brandcelona.com para que estudiemos las mejores alternativas y planificar cómo llevarlas a cabo en tu plan de negocio.

Views of the 20th century: Bentham // Lecturas del s.XX: Bentham

For a better understanding and to complete all those elements linked to the brand experience that influence the buying process, we will count with the collaboration of experts that will introduce concepts that will improve our business development, from different disciplines and points of view. Today we are pleased to introduce a new text of Insik W. Yoon, sociologist.

Few weeks ago I read an article in the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia titled May bosses be in closed offices? In it was said that Jack Dorsey, Twitter founder, designed his new company Square under the parameter of transparency, “the walls are made of glass and have ears. Everyone looks and there are no secrets.” The reason, according to Dorsey: promoting confidence and transparency between employees, which then moves to the customers. It seems that Dorsey is right, at least, that is what emerges from recent research carried out by Dr. Gilbert Roberts of the University of Newcastle. Roberts conducted an experiment with his students: he began a self-service cafeteria where each student should contribute financially to a common money box, but there was no one to control if the students paid for drinking coffee. Counted the proceeds during the first week, in the next week, placed several images of a pair of eyes (guards) around the coffee machine, and counted the proceeds. The experiment lasted several weeks alternating weeks “with” and “no images” and found that in the weeks with the images of the eyes had significantly collected more money. The conclusion of Roberts is that people cooperate more when they feel observed, when their behavior is more transparent to others because it creates an environment of greater trust between individuals. In fact, trust is essential to the economy, it facilitates transactions between people, generates credit and makes the economy grow.

You may probably heard this idea before, such as restaurants leave the kitchen staff exposed to guests: what helps promote customer confidence in the quality of service received, and in turn, increases the degree of control over the kitchen staff. Video surveillance cameras are based on the same principle, but its deterrent power depends to a largely far as they are perceived, then they should be more visible. Although I suspect that if it sounds familiar to us and we can recognize these patterns is because we have internalized those concepts for decades. Rewind to 1975 when Foucault wrote Discipline and Punish in which he recovered the concept of the panopticon as a symbol of the disciplinary society. According to Foucault, the defining elements of our societies are: the investment of the Greek theater architecture, this was a structure in which several people were able to see one, now is a person who sees a many, the constant gaze or presumption of its existence, the placement of individuals in locations that are observable, the multifunctionalism, for a range of institutions in which observation is basic to their management.

The Panopticon was a prison model designed by Jeremy Bentham in XVIIIth century, a model of prison in which everything could be watched from a point, without being seen. A glance would be enough to feel observed on himself, and may end up interiorizing its own watching. It is somewhat premonitory that Bentham proposed the Panopticon model for hospitals, schools, workplaces, … “Any situation in which people need to be in one place and develop their activity will be possible and advantageous to have this building.” The shops, malls, supermarkets and others, also play with the architectural elements to produce more transparent environments. As we can see, the “transparent business or enterprise” is a trend that bases on utilitarian sources. From the “big picture” to the transparencies, more than just a trend.

I.W.Y.
Ego Consumans

—-

Para completar y entender mejor todos los elementos vinculados a la experiencia de marca que inciden en el proceso de compra, contaremos con la colaboración de expertos que nos irán introduciendo, desde distintas disciplinas y visiones, conceptos que nos ayudarán a construir mejor nuestro negocio. Hoy estamos encantados de presentaros un nuevo texto de Insik W. Yoon, sociólogo.

Hace unas semanas leía en La Vanguardia un artículo titulado ¿Tienen que estar los jefes en despachos cerrados? En él se contaba que Jack Dorsey, fundador de Twitter, diseñó su nueva compañía Square bajo el parámetro de la transparencia: “las paredes son de glass y tienen oídos. Todo el mundo se ve y no hay secretos.” La razón, según Dorsey: promover la confianza y la transparencia en los empleados, lo que luego se traslada a los clientes. Al parecer Dorsey está en lo cierto, al menos, eso es lo que se desprende de las recientes investigaciones llevadas a cabo por el Dr. Gilbert Roberts, de la Universidad de Newcastle. Roberts llevó a cabo un experimento con sus alumnos: puso un auto-servicio de cafetería por el que cada estudiante debería de contribuir económicamente a una hucha común, pero no habría nadie para controlar que los estudiantes pagaran por consumir café. Contabilizaron lo recaudado durante la primera semana; en la siguiente semana, colocaron varias imágenes de un par de ojos (vigilantes) alrededor de la cafetera, y contabilizaron lo recaudado. El experimento duró varias semanas alternando semanas “con” y “sin imágenes”, y constataron que en las semanas con las imágenes de los ojos habían recaudado significativamente más. La conclusión de Roberts es que la gente coopera más cuando se siente observada, cuando su comportamiento es más transparente a los demás porque se crea un entorno de mayor confianza entre los individuos. De hecho, la confianza es esencial para la economía, facilita las transacciones entre personas, genera crédito y su agregado hace crecer la economía.

Probablemente les suene la idea de antes, como los restaurantes que dejan expuestos al personal de las cocinas a los comensales: lo que ayuda a promover la confianza de los clientes en la calidad del servicio recibido; y a su vez, incrementa el grado de control sobre los empleados de cocina. Las cámaras de video-vigilancia se inspiran en el mismo principio, pero su poder disuasorio depende en gran medida en que sean percibidas, luego deberían de estar más visibles. Aunque sospecho que si nos suena familiar y reconocemos esos patrones es porque llevamos varias décadas interiorizando esos conceptos. Retrocedamos a 1975, cuando Foucault escribió Vigilar y castigar en el que recuperaba el concepto del panóptico como símbolo de la sociedad disciplinaria. Según Foucault, los elementos que definen a nuestras sociedades son: la inversión de la arquitectura del teatro griego, ésta era una estructura en donde varias personas tenían la posibilidad de ver a una, ahora es una persona que ve a varias; la mirada constante o presunción de la existencia de ella; la fijación de los individuos en lugares en que sean observables; la polifuncionalidad, para una serie de instituciones en las cuales la observación es básica para el funcionamiento de las mismas.

El panóptico fue un modelo carcelario ideado por Jeremy Bentham en el s.XVIII, un modelo de cárcel en la cual se vigilara todo desde un punto, sin ser visto. Bastaría una mirada que vigile, y cada uno, sintiéndola pesar sobre sí, terminaría por interiorizarla hasta el punto de vigilarse a sí mismo. No deja de ser premonitorio que Bentham propusiera este modelo panóptico para hospitales, escuelas, lugares de trabajo, … “Cualquier situación en que es necesario que la gente esté en un mismo lugar y que desarrolle su actividad será posible y ventajoso disponer de esta construcción”. Los comercios, los centros comerciales, los supermercados y demás, también juegan con los elementos arquitectónicos para producir ambientes más transparentes. Como podemos apreciar, el “negocio o empresa transparente” es una tendencia que bebe de fuentes utilitaristas. De la “visión total” a las transparencias; más que una moda.

I.W.Y.
Ego Consumans